Archive for February 7th, 2008

07 Feb / 4:20 pm

Team Fortress 2 Competition Stagnation

Today while doing my normal after lunch blog search for the latest TF2 happenings I ran across an article over on Gameriot claiming that with 5 changes TF2 will magically become more competitive. While we agree with the last point about Valve creating an SDK for Team Fortress 2, we only half heartedly agree with the middle points, and completely disagree on the first one talking about Standarized Rule Sets and Player Limits. This post shows why we believe that the suggestions for rules and team sizes are perfect the way they are.

For ease of reference I have quoted the first point below and separated his primary arguments.

5. A Standardized Rule Set and Player Limit
A half-dozen leagues, all with different rules; HOW IS THIS HELPING THE GAME?

Now I know this is going to upset some of the diehard TFC players out there that refuse to give up your precious 8v8 format but it’s time to move on fellas. I know you and your seven buddies have been playing together for the better part of a decade now, that was a different game and it just isn’t working out; time to cut some of the stragglers from the team.

In all honestly, the maps that Valve has released so far feel cramped and like a constant spawn rape with 8v8. For competitive play, I think that 6v6 is the good choice and this is only emphasized with the bit smaller maps that are being produced by the community now.

To those 8v8 teams out there; time to do some choosing.

  1. HOW IS THIS HELPING THE GAME?
  2. Multiple leagues help the game by allowing teams to try different formats for themselves and find which one matches their play style and personnel availability. The elitist mentality of “we are the best so we obviously know what is best” turns a whole lot of people off. Everyone has a different view of what TF2 is and having multiple leagues organizing multiple clans creates a fertile environment where everyone can see their vision of TF2 materialize.

    Continue Reading »